Wood Warblers among the Ruschias and a Wag(tail)-ing Pup

The Autumn A Year of Techniques patterns were a great excuse to spruce up cold weather wardrobes with fun accessories while also learning some fab skills. Let’s have a look at some of the brilliant projects AYOT knitters whipped up!

September’s pattern was the Wood Warbler Cowl by Martina Behm, which gave us a chance to practice garter stitch grafting. Martina’s clever cowl begins with a provisional cast on (building on skills learned in August) and had many of us wondering how the rather funnily shaped flat piece was going to resolve itself into a cowl.

Brenda’s ( McBrenda ) Wood Warbler pre-grafting. Brenda had good fun “bossing” around three different yarns to achieve her lovely version. You can find full details on her Ravelry project page.

Brenda’s (McBrenda) Wood Warbler pre-grafting. Brenda had good fun “bossing” around three different yarns to achieve her lovely version. You can find full details on her Ravelry project page.

Almost like magic though, garter stitch grafting brings the piece together into a symmetrical, kerchief style cowl. The pattern makes the most of two shades of Schoppel Gradient, and it was fun to see the different combinations people put together. I’m particularly fond of the turquoises and oranges of Anne’s version:

Anne ( amaknitter ) knit her Wood Warbler in shades 2202 and 2135. She actually knit the cowl twice after deciding she wanted her gradients to align in a different way — the gorgeous end result was worth the effort, I’d say!

Anne (amaknitter) knit her Wood Warbler in shades 2202 and 2135. She actually knit the cowl twice after deciding she wanted her gradients to align in a different way — the gorgeous end result was worth the effort, I’d say!

Many knitters chose to coordinate their Wood Warblers with October’s project, the Ruschia Hat by Woolly Wormhead, which taught short-row shaping while also giving us a chance to perfect the garter stitch grafting from September. Here’s Nancy (who is also one of our Ravelry group moderators) looking very cool in her coordinating set:

Nancy ( layingcable ) with a beautiful backdrop of autumn leaves

Nancy (layingcable) with a beautiful backdrop of autumn leaves

And here’s Julie’s particularly joyful combo. She paired a speckled yarn with a solid for her cowl and knit her Rushia hat in a complementary speckled shade — all of which go with her lovely handknit cardigan:

Julie ( crochet-julie ) has such a way with colour!

Julie (crochet-julie) has such a way with colour!

November’s technique was understanding charted cable symbols. Sarah Hatton’s Yellow Wagtail Scarf, with its plump cables and squishy garter stitch, provided a great way to practice. The clever asymmetrical shaping makes the scarf extra cozy around the neck, while minimizing bulk. You can see the gentle curve of the design in this lovely shot of Claire’s finished scarf:

Claire’s ( soupdragon ) wonderfully neat cables!

Claire’s (soupdragon) wonderfully neat cables!

Four-legged friends also approved of the design:

Kyle’s ( haliankcb ) dog is a very obliging model!

Kyle’s (haliankcb) dog is a very obliging model!

These are just a few of the great projects inspired by the Autumn techniques. If you’re after some inspiration, do have a browse of the projects on Ravelry — you’ll not only find beautiful finished objects, but also excellent project notes that are testament to the learning that happened back in Fall 2017! The Autumn video tutorials are all, of course, still available. And if you fancy learning something new and getting a warm neck in the process, we’ve still got Yellow Wagtail Scarf kits and Wood Warbler Cowl kits in the shop — though they’ll be retired next month to make way for new A Year of Techniques kits! If you’ve had your eye on the Ruschia hat, we have just a few skeins of Fyberspates Scrumptious Aran in select colours left (on sale to boot!), or I think it’d also look stunning in a cheery skein of Something to Knit with Aran!

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